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The Hidden War: A Russian Journalist's Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan #2020

The Hidden War: A Russian Journalist's Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan By Artyom Borovik The Hidden War A Russian Journalist s Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan Until his death in Artyom Borovik was considered one of the preeminent journalists in Russia With The Hidden War he provided the world its first glimpse inside the Soviet military machine captu
  • Title: The Hidden War: A Russian Journalist's Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan
  • Author: Artyom Borovik
  • ISBN: 9780871132833
  • Page: 141
  • Format: Unknown Binding
  • The Hidden War: A Russian Journalist's Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan By Artyom Borovik Until his death in 2000, Artyom Borovik was considered one of the preeminent journalists in Russia With The Hidden War he provided the world its first glimpse inside the Soviet military machine, capturing the soldiers terror, helplessness, and despair at waging war in a foreign land against an unseen enemy for unclear purposes When first published, Borovik s groundbreakUntil his death in 2000, Artyom Borovik was considered one of the preeminent journalists in Russia With The Hidden War he provided the world its first glimpse inside the Soviet military machine, capturing the soldiers terror, helplessness, and despair at waging war in a foreign land against an unseen enemy for unclear purposes When first published, Borovik s groundbreaking revelations exposed the weaknesses beneath the Soviet Union s aura of military might, creating an enormous controversy both in Russia and around the world A vital and fascinating portrait of the Soviet empire at the twilight of its power, this is a book that still resonates today An honest and graphic account of individual and general disillusionment during the very worst kind of war Christopher Hitchens, New York Newsday Alternately fascinating and horrific A fascinating look at the life and death of Soviet soldiers Bill Wallace, San Francisco Chronicle I have read no other account of the war in Afghanistan equal to this this is literature Graham Greene
    The Hidden War: A Russian Journalist's Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan By Artyom Borovik
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    About "Artyom Borovik"

    1. Artyom Borovik

      Artyom Borovik Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Hidden War: A Russian Journalist's Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan book, this is one of the most wanted Artyom Borovik author readers around the world.

    702 Comments

    1. To say that this war was a mistake is to say nothing at all It s a lot easier to find a mistake than to find the truth Franz Ferdinand is alive World War I was a mistake Leonid Brezhnev was wrong The war in Afghanistan was a mistake Those two phrases deserve each other.The Soviet Union s nine year war in Afghanistan, despite their staunch refusal to admit as much, was their version of the USA s Vietnam war Borovik only mentions this fact in passing in his wonderfully crafted, first hand journali [...]


    2. The Hidden War A Russian Journalist s Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan 1990 Artyom Borovik Hahahah, hohohoh This can t be can it I turn on NPR this morning and hear that Barack Obama, America s brand new, progressive, liberal, Generation Next, first ever bi racial president is sending troops and advisors into Afghanistan The mission to strengthen and tame that country, make it a safe place for freedom, democracy, and capitalism i.e a friend of America I thought Obama was smarter than t [...]


    3. Heros or zeros The Russian soldier was sent into Afghanistan to fight the American soldier and to help the Afghani people retain their freedom Instead they found themselves fighting against the very same people who they were supposed to save For a soldier steeped in ideological propaganda it was a horrid experience The soldier found his escape shooting drugs to get over shooting ordinary Afghans Looks like moral was a major issue in the 1980 invasion of Afghanistan War without proper justificati [...]


    4. I read this book in late 2001, as I was interested in learning about what the United States was getting itself into as its invasion and occupation of Afghanistan took shape following the atrocities of 9 11 The risks of such an endeavor were palpable Afghanistan was notoriously a country that had never been conquered, and the Soviets learned that bitter lesson first hand during their invasion and occupation from 1979 1989 Afghanistan was the Soviet Vietnam , in that it began under dubious circums [...]


    5. This book is a telling account of the Russian invasion of Afghanistan, which was one of the disasters that cemented the fall of the Soviet Union Some of the writing, by a Russian journalist, is very good One hospital scene reminded me of Bob Dylan s song Ballad of a Thin Man, in its portrayal of a reporter trying to understand an un understandable world though Dylan s was a critique of the profession, and author Artyom Borovik s was not Here it is Colonel Frolov, the chief of the hospital s psyc [...]


    6. Pretty good read Intriguing depictions of Soviet Russian soldiers on the frontlines in Afghanistan during the Soviet Afghan War from 1979 1988 Probably the most fascinating thing to me was how much this truly read like a depiction of the American soldier s experience in Vietnam, as cliched as that may sound Simoly substitute the sub tropical climate and malaria ridden jungles of southeast Asia for the desolate montaine regions of Aghanistan, and you have the perfect parallel Soldiers suffering i [...]


    7. Borovik s account of the Soviet campaign in Afghanistan goes into some harsh truths about the war and the people who fought in it He devotes less time to maneuvers and engagements than I expected, focusing instead on quiet conversations with soldiers, deserters, officers and politicians The overall sentiment is one of wasted efforts, resources and lives cloaked by government sanctioned media that present a much rosier picture of progress and achievement It is sad and fucked up how familiar this [...]


    8. Two essays The first has the hopefulness of an naive embedded journalist The second brims with the pain of defeat as the last Soviet soldiers leave Afghanistan Odd as it may sound, to gain perspective today,I think it is crucial to read Soviet accounts of war in Afghanistan In Soviet idealism and in Soviet misery, US ians can find an echo in their twin.


    9. This book is one of the best books I have read on war It shows what the soldiers were thinking at such a time How the morale carried from high at the beginning and it reached an all time low at the end of the war At the same time Borovik talks about the war tearing up the mountain sides, he talks about how peaceful it truly was when there was no war.


    10. I read this book in late 2009 It is a good start to understand the deception and self deception a nation must employ to believe what the Russians once believed that the entity called Afghanistan is ours to save.


    11. A young Russian journalist spends a month with Soviet troops during the invasion of Afghanistan 1979 1989 A rare account of life and war with the secretive Soviet Army and their own Vietnam.


    12. Borovik s book is to the Soviet Afghan War sort of what Dispatches is to the American war in Vietnam, though Borovik was a bit less stream of consciousness in style than Herr Very good.



    13. Interesting first person accounts of the Soviet war in Afghanistan written by a journalist Reminded me a lot of similar books I ve read about Vietnam.



    14. The author acknowledges in the beginning of the book that this is only a snapshot and one person s perspective With that understanding, this is a great book that provides a unique perspective into the Russian war in Afghanistan in the 1980s The story reads like a novel because the author tells it so well He also manages to capture the perspective of the Russian participants, providing a much different picture of the war than what is portrayed in most other accounts that I ve read.


    15. A really interesting book A Russian oral history of the entire Soviet Afghanistan experience One is reminded of both American Vietnam literature with the Helicopters and the feeling of uselessness, and of the modern western experience in Afghanistan with the same place names and experience with the Taliban Dukhi Throughout, Borovik writes with that extra artistic flair that has marked Russian war journalism since it began This is a book that is perfect for Military enthusiasts, but also a good r [...]


    16. This was than a little depressing.To start with, this is NOT the book you want if you are looking for a history of the Soviet war in Afghanistan Borovik assumes the reader knows the basic outline of the whole war and a fair amount of the Russian perspective on the invasion, occupation or international support duty I knew the American version of the war a little mostly from Charlie Wislon s War but I found myself confused at several points by the author s assumptions of what I knew.This makes se [...]


    17. A depressing book about a depressing subject Which concisely sums up about every great powers experience in Afghanistan This book gives a unique perspective from a not very often heard in the west soviet perspective This book constantly reminded me of similar books about other small wars The events and dates change but the experience stay the same.


    18. If only our leaders had read this book before deciding to make the war in Afghanistan less about Al Qaeda and about the Taliban as the Russians could have told us much.


    19. Very good, I liked the authors writing style and he manages to take many disparate stories and weave them into a narrative of overarching hopelessness at a useless war a darkly funny anecdote is a mujahideen telling the author that he was happy for American help and weapons because he needed them, but wouldn t hesitate to fight anyone who invaded his country now the American presence in Afghanistan is approaching the length of time the soviets were there and it seemed like an apt warning in retr [...]


    20. I feel like an idiot for reading several books and listening to lecture about this war and not letting any of it sink in but this book helped me review a bit before I get The Ninth Company, a movie I ve heard depicts this Soviet Afghan conflict excellently.I should have a better grasp of it, especially since I ve been considering it for so long, but I don t.








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