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Nart Sagas from the Caucasus: Myths and Legends from the Circassians, Abazas, Abkhaz, and Ubykhs #2020

Nart Sagas from the Caucasus: Myths and Legends from the Circassians, Abazas, Abkhaz, and Ubykhs By John Colarusso Nart Sagas from the Caucasus Myths and Legends from the Circassians Abazas Abkhaz and Ubykhs The Nart sagas are to the Caucasus what Greek mythology is to Western civilization This book presents for the first time in the West a wide selection of these fascinating myths preserved among four
  • Title: Nart Sagas from the Caucasus: Myths and Legends from the Circassians, Abazas, Abkhaz, and Ubykhs
  • Author: John Colarusso
  • ISBN: 9780691026473
  • Page: 122
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Nart Sagas from the Caucasus: Myths and Legends from the Circassians, Abazas, Abkhaz, and Ubykhs By John Colarusso The Nart sagas are to the Caucasus what Greek mythology is to Western civilization This book presents, for the first time in the West, a wide selection of these fascinating myths preserved among four related peoples whose ancient cultures today survive by a thread In ninety two straightforward tales populated by extraordinary characters and exploits, by giants who humbleThe Nart sagas are to the Caucasus what Greek mythology is to Western civilization This book presents, for the first time in the West, a wide selection of these fascinating myths preserved among four related peoples whose ancient cultures today survive by a thread In ninety two straightforward tales populated by extraordinary characters and exploits, by giants who humble haughty Narts, by horses and sorceresses, Nart Sagas from the Caucasus brings these cultures to life in a powerful epos.In these colorful tales, women, not least the beautiful temptress Satanaya, the mother of all Narts, are not only fertility figures but also pillars of authority and wisdom In one variation on a recurring theme, a shepherd, overcome with passion on observing Satanaya bathing alone, shoots a bolt of lust that strikes a rock a rock that gives birth to the Achilles like Sawseruquo, or Sosruquo With steely skin but tender knees, Sawseruquo is a man the Narts come to love and hate.Despite a tragic history, the Circassians, Abazas, Abkhaz, and Ubykhs have retained the Nart sagas as a living tradition The memory of their elaborate warrior culture, so richly expressed by these tales, helped them resist Tsarist imperialism in the nineteenth century, Stalinist suppression in the twentieth, and has bolstered their ongoing cultural journey into the post Soviet future.Because these peoples were at the crossroads of Eurasia for millennia, their myths exhibit striking parallels with the lore of ancient India, classical Greece, and pagan Scandinavia The Nart sagas may also have formed a crucial component of the Arthurian cycle Notes after each tale reveal these parallels an appendix offers extensive linguistic commentary With this book, no longer will the analysis of ancient Eurasian myth be possible without a close look at the Nart sagas And no longer will the lover of myth be satisfied without the pleasure of having read them Excerpts from the Nart sagas The Narts were a tribe of heroes They were huge, tall people, and their horses were also exuberant Alyps or Durduls They were wealthy, and they also had a state That is how the Narts lived their lives The Narts were courageous, energetic, bold, and good hearted Thus they lived until God sent down a small swallow The Narts were very cruel to one another They were envious of one another They disputed among themselves over who was the most courageous But most of all they hated Sosruquo A rock gave birth to him He is the son of a rock, illegally born a mere shepherd s son
    Nart Sagas from the Caucasus: Myths and Legends from the Circassians, Abazas, Abkhaz, and Ubykhs By John Colarusso
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      122 John Colarusso
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      Posted by:John Colarusso
      Published :2019-02-04T08:59:58+00:00

    About "John Colarusso"

    1. John Colarusso

      John s major interests are Linguistics, Historical Linguistics, Comparative Mythology, the size of language Vastness Theory , and International Relations culture and nationalism Geographic interests are centered on Inner Eurasia, especially the Caucasus, and cover both modern and ancient periods Also, at times, John served as an informal diplomat and advisor in matters concerning the Caucasus and its peoples.Born in California, raised in Mississippi and New Jersey.John Colarusso first studied physics and then took two degrees in philosophy BA Cornell, MA Northwestern.He earned his doctorate in Linguistics from Harvard University in 1975 Since 1967 he has studied the Caucasus, its languages, myths, and cultures.He has taught at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario since 1976 Since 1992 he has been active in advising leaders and policy makers in Washington, Ottawa, Moscow, and the Caucasus itself.In addition to than sixty five articles on Linguistics, myth, politics, and the Caucasus, he has written three books, edited one, and is finishing two .He is married and the father of three children When relaxing he enjoys hiking and biking, or reading math, paleontology, and the works of William Faulkner.

    547 Comments

    1. its about Circassian legends, a very old legends even oldest than Greeks.I like this book, coz it is the first one in English about our legends


    2. John This book is fascinating both for those interested in the stories from the Caucasus and for those interested in comparative mythology Many core myths of the western European traditions show their roots in these stories, with many interesting permutations of characters and incidents Truly one of the most worthwhile reads I have ever enjoyed.


    3. This was a very interesting read although for me also somewhat dissapointing I found the notes to each saga too scanty and sometimes farfetched I had hoped for parallells with other Indo European mythologies and missed many parallells from the Celtic world I saw many relations with the stories of Pryderi, Peredur, C Chulainn etc Then again what I lacked in this book opens new possibilities for me to research and perhaps it was not the main scope of this book to provide extensive comparative not [...]


    4. The same person who lent me Bullough s book had this on their shelves.And since the eradication of the Nart s was the worst bit of Bullough s book, I was keen to read this book.And I love folk stories And these stories are wonderful.After each story, there are history notes And very detailed linguistic notes too I started by thinking those were a waste of time But I m very well behaved about reading books that are cleverer than me.And the author is right that all the word details give you lots [...]



    5. Excellent translations, wonderful linguistic explanations for the background, and the man himself is a wonderful lecturer.


    6. I had the honour of being in his Mythology class at McMaster University a decade ago Brilliant man Brilliant book Definitely recommended.


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