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Joheved #2020

Joheved By Maggie Anton Joheved In the scholar Salomon ben Isaac returns home to Troyes France to take over the family winemaking business and embark on a path that will indelibly influence the Jewish world writing the first
  • Title: Joheved
  • Author: Maggie Anton
  • ISBN: 9780452288621
  • Page: 231
  • Format: Paperback
  • Joheved By Maggie Anton In 1068, the scholar Salomon ben Isaac returns home to Troyes, France, to take over the family winemaking business and embark on a path that will indelibly influence the Jewish world writing the first Talmud commentary, and secretly teaching Talmud to his daughters Joheved, the eldest of his three girls, finds her mind and spirit awakened by religious study, but, knowing In 1068, the scholar Salomon ben Isaac returns home to Troyes, France, to take over the family winemaking business and embark on a path that will indelibly influence the Jewish world writing the first Talmud commentary, and secretly teaching Talmud to his daughters Joheved, the eldest of his three girls, finds her mind and spirit awakened by religious study, but, knowing the risk, she must keep her passion for learning and prayer hidden When she becomes betrothed to Meir ben Samuel, she is forced to choose between marital happiness and being true to her love of the Talmud Rich in period detail and drama, Joheved is a must read for fans of Tracy Chevalier s Girl With a Pearl Earring.
    Joheved By Maggie Anton
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      231 Maggie Anton
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      Posted by:Maggie Anton
      Published :2020-03-06T00:42:21+00:00

    About "Maggie Anton"

    1. Maggie Anton

      Maggie Anton was born Margaret Antonofsky in Los Angeles, California Raised in a secular, socialist household, she reached adulthood with little knowledge of her Jewish religion All that changed when David Parkhurst, who was to become her husband, entered her life, and they both discovered Judaism as adults That was the start of a lifetime of Jewish education, synagogue involvement, and ritual observance In 2006, Anton retired from being a clinical chemist in Kaiser Permanente s Biochemical Genetics Laboratory to become a fulltime writer.In the early 1990 s, Anton learned about a women s Talmud class taught by Rachel Adler, now a professor at Hebrew Union College in Los Angeles She became intrigued with the idea that Rashi, one of the greatest Jewish scholars ever, had no sons, only three daughters Slowly but surely, she began to research the family and the time in which they lived Much was written about Rashi, but almost nothing of the daughters, except their names and the names of their husbands Legend has it that Rashi s daughters were learned in a time when women were traditionally forbidden to study the sacred texts These forgotten women seemed ripe for rediscovery, and the idea of a trilogy of historical novels about them was born After the success of Rashi s Daughters Anton started researching the lives of women in 4th century Babylonia, where the Talmud was being created Surprised by the prevalence of sorcery among rabbinic families, she wrote Rav Hisda s Daughter Bk 1 Apprentice, which was a 2012 National Jewish Book Award Fiction finalist and a Library Journal pick for Best Historical Fiction This was followed by its sequel, Enchantress A Novel of Rav Hisda s Daughter Anton s then turned her attention to nonfiction, with the publication of Fifty Shades of Talmud What the First Rabbis Had to Say about You Know What, a light hearted look at sexuality in the Talmud.

    990 Comments

    1. I wanted to like this book, I really did Anton seeks to bring to life a place, time and people who have been overlooked She obviously did a lot of research, and boy does it show The book is crammed full of information on things like 11th century agriculture, French politics, and Jewish law, and tries to faithfully render to the most minute detail moss used for toilet paper how to prune grape vines a demon for every cough and bad thought what it would have been like to grow up the daughter of Ras [...]



    2. This is as much a book about medieval Jewish scholarship as it is about Rashi s family his family members seem to circle the Talmud, supporting characters to its central theme s.This is not to say that it wasn t incredibly fascinating to read regardless I learned so much about Ashkenazi Jewry as well as general life in France during the High Middle Ages Some of the rituals and tradtions presented I actually remembered from reading a contemporary story The Ritual Bath it s amazing that these thi [...]


    3. This book about the eldest daughter of the great Talmudic sage Rashi had such great reviews, I expected It was enjoyable and had interesting, even fascinating, information on medieval Jewish life but it was, I thought, clumsily written And what was with the sex scenes I mean, I like a good reasonably explicit sex scene as much as the next person, and I m sure that medieval Jewish folks liked their sex, but those scenes felt really out of place, as though they were dropped in just for the prurie [...]


    4. I haven t been a reader of traditional romance novels since I was in high school, and a certain percentage of this book is in fact that It conforms to a lot of your expected tropes of that genre I am, however, a reader these days of Jewish cultural history, and this book is also that Specifically, it concerns the lives of women in France a thousand years ago, and the circumstances surrounding what it was like to be an educated daughter of a scholar at that time I found it fascinating and well do [...]


    5. From a historical perspective, this book as well as Anton s second book in this series is fascinating Anton has obviously done a great deal of research, and she has focused on making the world of medieval French Judaism come to life However, there are two aspects that I want to focus on that detract significantly from this book, which had so much potential One aspect is Anton s exposition, which is often very heavy handed I would have loved to have gotten lost in the world that Anton describes, [...]


    6. This book was an amazing read I learned so much, which is what I love about good historical fiction There were so many times in this book that I thought to myself, so that s why we do that in terms of Jewish traditions I did find myself wondering as I was reading if a non Jewish reader would have difficulty understanding it The author is a female Talmud scholar herself, which I find so impressive, and it lends credence to the series I can t wait to read the next book In fact, I think I might hav [...]


    7. A very sensitive story of a far from ordinary Jewish father and daughter For those who want to understand why Jews study Talmud, this is a great place to begin.


    8. I really liked the idea of this book Unfortunately, it s deplorably excecuted and the narrative totaly fails For starters, each character has an identical personality the same one as the ploddingly matter of fact narrator Each incosequential conflict is promptly resolved with predicatble regularity As for an actual plot to draw the story forward, there is none The prose is brittle and earnest it s just, eugh, awkward to read this The only parts that actually work narratively are the sex scenes, [...]


    9. This was an odd book The author clearly has researched the family and the era very well, but the end result isn t really a novel There was no narrative arc just lots of info about daily life some things, like the making of parchment, appeared to be thrown in simply because the author had learned about it Joheved didn t seem like a real person nor did Rashi, nor anyone else and her motivation to study Torah like the men was never made clear and the repercussions of her doing so seemed minor About [...]


    10. Didn t like this one as much as I thought I would I thought the style of writing was kind of annoying I can t quite put my finger on it I ll probably read the rest of the series though It was entertaining enough Interesting to learn about Jewish traditions as well.Okay so an update I finished this one and I just don t think I ll read the other s in the series.The summary of the plot on the back of the book makes you think it is going to be all about how Joheved is going to fight for her right to [...]


    11. I d say 3.5I enjoyed the book but there was a bit too much graphic Talmudic sex Also, I was constantly noticing the religious practices that are different from today s and wondering if they really were different in those days or if the author just isn t aware of normative Orthodox practice For instance, mixed dancing at a wedding, men sitting around chatting with each other while waiting for their wives at the mikva and later discussing who was there, women attending weekday Shacharit services o [...]


    12. I absolutely loved this book So much so that I could not put it down and went straight into reading the next in the series I will certainly read all 3 I have prior knowledge of orthodox Judaism and Torah Talmud that made it easier for me to understand the lingo however there is a glossary The author does a fantastic job of developing the characters, so much so that I felt I could actually see them and understand their feelings I greatly look forward to the next book, I am already several pages i [...]


    13. Usually I m not a huge historical fiction person I often find my my purist tendencies get in the way of my enjoyment of historical fiction Rashi s Daughters came highly recommended to me by a close friend from my synagogue It shared a lot of similarities, at least in voice, to Anita Diamant s The Red Tent It had engaging relationships between the characters and even though it s from Joheved s perspective, for the most part, others in the story are well rounded One thing I feel that engaging hist [...]


    14. Wtf Jews like to drink This book was sure an interesting surprise to me that way Hmmmm I grew up with an alcoholic father but imagine growing up with a Jewish wine making father in medieval France That s Rashi s daughters for you The central theme here seems to be education for women It was touchy subject at the time with many interpretations of what was appropriate and what was not In the beginning of the book Joheved is already fluent in Hebrew and is able to read, study, and translate the tor [...]


    15. I enjoyed this novel much than I expected to Historical fiction often bogs down in the middle as the author tries to cram in a lot of the background research and it often shows In this case, I had been afraid Anton would get involved in the powerstruggle in mideval France and leave me behind, but fortunately it didn t happen Instead, we are given an insider s view into the creation of a small yeshiva, and the impact on a family of daughters whose father decides it s all right to teach them Tora [...]


    16. Set in Medieval France in the 1000s, this book is a fiction love story about Rashi s eldest daughter, who the author calls Joheved Salomen ben Isaac, known as Rashi, is the most famous Jewish commentator of the Bible and Talmud I usually find romance novels rather dull because they tend to all tell the same story, but this book successfully combines wonderful historical fiction about Rashi and the Jewish religion in France in the middle ages and the lifestyle of the people along with the romance [...]


    17. I don t read a lot of fiction books because they often fail to cast their spell on me There are some books that are just impossible to read, and others that are pleasant reading but I can almost tell you exactly why the author did everything they did This falls into the latter category This book is or less a formula copy of the Red Tent sent in a less heroic, darker, and obscure era of Jewish history Diamant at least cast her spell I felt like I knew Dinah A quick check of the presumptuous rea [...]


    18. Jewish history and traditions have always fascinated me so this book was right up my alley It is about Salomon Ben Isaac, now known as Rashi He lived about 1068 in France He was a scholar who left his studies to take over the family winemaking business Rashi was the first scholar to write a commentary on the Talmud, and is the recognized authority on the Talmud During the period when he lived the Jews and Christians were at peace, each community living mostly to themselves except for some trade [...]


    19. I read this book for the A Book A Day Keeps the Boredom at Bay challenge 27 Is the perfect cube 3 X 3 X 3 Read a book from 3 different trilogies yes, that means 3 books Or read a book about a mathematic riddle or code, books like The Da Vinci Code or The Eight are a good example for this one 2 3 I enjoyed this book very much, although I really don t think there was much of a plot to it Basically, it describes a Jewish family in 11th century France daily life, jobs, schools, superstitions and bel [...]


    20. Both of these books Rashi s Daughters, Book I Book II are entertaining and thought provoking Throughout both books are many quotations from the Torah and various comments on the quotations, including Rashi s I found this helpful as I have often wondered about the source of those studied today Another aspect of these books that I enjoyed was the explanation of many of the superstitions that we find in our current cultures Although I had to stop sometimes to figure out which parts of the novels we [...]


    21. By far, it is one of the best historical novels I ve read in a long time Actually, it is the kind of story that I started in the morning and finished a couple of hours later in the night, due to the author s fascinating art of writing As a reader, you are part not only of the life story of the oldest Rashi s daughter, Joheved, but also of the Medieval Jewish France and of the daily life of Rashi himself The merit of the story is that you can go far beyond the circumstances of the reality and you [...]


    22. I really enjoyed this book and read it pretty quickly.I felt that it may be difficult for people not familiar with the Jewish religion to understand a lot of what was going on how the lives revolved around study, the religious concepts or even the prevalence of superstitionsd.I thought the suspense of the book would revolve around whether or not a learned woman would find a husband or not, but once that was resolved, it was an interesting read but I didn t know what for I kept waiting for someth [...]


    23. 3.5 stars I enjoyed this book I m not sure I enjoyed it enough to run right out and find the next two books in the series, but I ll probably pick them up sometime It s set in 11th century France, in a Jewish community I liked how much I learned about the Jewish culture faith I certainly know about Jewish marital intimacy than I did a few days ago It s discussed rather a lot, but most of it is not explicit Very interesting.


    24. A book which somehow drifts from the bodice ripping of historical romance to lofty excursions into the minutiae of Talmudic scholarship and back again with a great deal skill and grace The characters are engaging and the world of medieval French Jewry that is revealed through the progress of their lives is fascinating and clearly well researched An only slightly guilty pleasure.


    25. I really liked this book Compelling characters and a story that was familiar yet exotic I enjoyed learning while reading hurray for historical fiction about Judaism, everyday medieval life, and the role of Jews in medieval society.I enjoyed that the heroine was a strong, independent female that found ways to be herself in a society and time where she had a prescribed life.


    26. First volume of a family saga trilogy story is well written The thoroughly researched details about daily life in France during the Middle Ages and Torah Talmud are fascinating I wish I knew some of this detail about women s role in rights to Jewish learning some time ago.




    27. Very interesting and enjoyable read I liked reading about the superstitions and customs of the Jewish community during this period Seemed well researched Will read the rest of the series.


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